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Two in five African-American women know a prisoner

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news-wildeman-inpostRecent research findings, co-authored by BCTR affiliate and fellow Christopher Wildeman (Policy Analysis & Management), show that on average African-American adults, and women in particular, are more likely to be acquainted with someone who is incarcerated  than whites. Forty-four percent of black women and 32 percent of black men have a family member, neighbor, or acquaintance in prison, compared to 12 percent of white women and 6 percent of white men.

In a Cornell Chronicle article, Wildeman notes,

Our estimates show even deeper racial inequalities in connectedness to prisoners than previous work might have implied. Because imprisonment has negative consequences not only for the men and women who cycle through the system but also for the parents, partners and progeny they leave behind, mass imprisonment’s long-term consequences of racial inequality in the United States might be even greater than any of us working in this area had originally suspected.

These results show further racial inequality wrought by the U.S. prison boom, with potentially harmful consequences to families and communities lacking social supports to raise children and manage households.

The study was led by University of Washington associate professor of sociology Hedwig Lee ’03 and co-authored by Wildeman and was published by Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race. The article, Racial Inequalities in Connectedness to Imprisoned Individuals in the United States, is co-authored by Tyler McCormick at the University of Washington and Margaret Hicken at the University of Michigan. The study was unfunded.

Wildeman is co-organizer (with Anna Haskins, Sociology, and Julie Poelhmann-Tynan, University of Wisconsin - Madison) of the 2016 Bronfebrenner Conference, which will examine mass incarceration's effects on children.

 

Study: 2 in 5 African-American women know a prisoner - Cornell Chronicle
Racial inequalities in connectedness to imprisoned individuals in the United States - Du Bois Review

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Valerie Adams co-authors chapter in new volume on racial stereotyping

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Valerie Adams, NY State 4-H Leader, co-authored a chapter, "Media Socialization, Black Media Images and Black Adolescent Identity," in the newly-published Racial Stereotyping and Child Development (Karger).

 

 

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TRIPLL Leads New York City Community Forum on Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Pain and Pain Management

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TRIPLL New York City Community ForumOn October 12, 2011 the Translational Research Institute on Pain in Later Life (TRIPLL: Cornell’s Edward R. Roybal Center) led a community and researcher forum on developing innovative strategies to address racial and ethnic disparities in pain and pain management in later life. Carmen Green, MD, Professor of Health Management and Policy at University of Michigan Ann Arbor delivered the keynote at the event, “Pain and the Science of Inclusion.” Two panels led by community agency and research experts discussed the role of community-researcher partnerships in addressing health disparities. The event was attended by over 100 researchers, community practitioners, industry representatives, and funders. Next steps will include a dialogue between researchers and community practitioners to generate a collaborative research agenda that engages community practitioners and researchers as equal partners. TRIPLL is a unique collaboration of medical, social, behavioral, and health science researchers who collaborate with diverse agencies in New York City to translate research findings into practical solutions for older adults who suffer from persistent pain. The event was co-sponsored by the Weill Cornell Clinical and Translational Research Center (CTSC) and the Weill Comprehensive Center of Excellence in Disparities Research and Community Engagement (CEDREC).

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Talks at Twelve: Anthony Burrow, Thursday, April 12, 2012

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event-burrowtalkat12-square

Purpose in Life as an Asset for Positive Adjustment
Anthony Burrow, Assistant Professor, Human Development

Thursday, April 12, 2012
12:00 – 1:00 PM
Beebe Hall, 2nd floor conference room



It has become nearly axiomatic that a purpose in life is a good thing to have. Numerous studies with adults affirm that possessing a meaningful direction and purpose for one’s life corresponds with a host of positive outcomes including greater life satisfaction and fulfillment, positive emotionality, psychological well-being, and resilience to stress. Rarely, however, have researchers asked the extent to which purpose is relevant to adjustment during adolescence, or even if youth are capable of developing such a profound sense of direction for one’s life. In this talk, I will share findings from several studies my colleagues and I have conducted suggesting that not only do many youth consider their purpose in broad and differentiated ways, but that those who are most engaged with this sense may be uniquely equipped to optimally negotiate challenges traditionally thought to thwart adaptive youth development.

Dr. Anthony Burrow is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Development in the College of Human Ecology at Cornell University. His research examines broadly the significance of developing positive identities and a meaningful sense of direction during adolescence and young adulthood. Dr. Burrow’s primary line of work examines how racial identity, in particular, influences the psychological adjustment to negative experiences reported by minorities. A second line of inquiry concerns the role of identifying and committing to a sense of purpose in life. Both of these research interests emphasis the importance of understanding how cultivating a sense of identity and purpose promote optimal psychosocial adjustment in the everyday lives of young people. Dr. Burrow received his B.A. in Psychology from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology from Florida International University.

Lunch will be served. This talk is open to all.  Metered parking is available across Plantations Rd. in The Plantations lot.

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