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2016 Doris Lecture: Judi Smetana, Wednesday, April 20, 2016

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JUDITH G SMETANAPROFESSORCLINICAL & SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

Adolescent-Parent Relationships: Developmental Processes and Cultural Variations
Judi Smetana, University of Rochester

Wednesday, April 20, 2016
12:00PM
Nevin Welcome Center, The Plantations



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2015 John Doris Memorial Lecture

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Implementation Research in State Systems for Children with Behavioral Health Needs
Tuesday, April 14, 2015

Kimberly Eaton Hoagwood
School of Medicine, New York University

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2015 Doris Lecture: Kimberly Eaton Hoagwood, Tuesday, April 14, 2015

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Implementation Research in State Systems for Children with Behavioral Health Needs
Kimberly Eaton Hoagwood, New York University

Tuesday, April 14, 2015
12:00 PM
Nevin Welcome Center, The Plantations



Dissemination-Implementation science has emerged over the past decade replete with conceptual models and studies of barriers to the successful implementation of evidence-based programs. This work has been of limited usefulness to state systems that are undergoing massive changes due to changes in the healthcare system. These changes target accountability, costs, and outcomes of state services. In the rush by state health and mental health authorities to accommodate these changes, services for children and adolescents are being largely overlooked. Yet ironically the most direct way to address system problems is through redesign of prevention and intervention services for children. This entails closing the gap between evidence-based care and its implementation in real world settings. A body of research is emerging that identifies system-level, organizational-level, and individual-level (child and family) interventions that can dramatically improve services and outcomes for children and adolescents. Approaches include evidence-based framing, strategic collaborative interventions, quality metrics, and data driven feedback systems. In her talk, Dr. Kimberly Hoagwood will provide examples of each and recommend a research agenda to accelerate practical progress.

Kimberly Hoagwood is Cathy and Stephen Graham Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry and Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the New York University School of Medicine. She is Director and Principal Investigator of an Advanced Center on Implementation and Dissemination Science in States for Children and Families, located at New York University and funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (P30 MH090322), called The IDEAS Center. She co-directs the Clinic Technical Assistance Center with Dr. Mary McKay, funded by the New York State Office of Mental Health.

Previously Kimberly was Professor of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry at Columbia University, specializing in children’s mental health services research. She also works with the division of Children, Youth and Families at the New York State Office of Mental Health (NYSOMH) as a Research Scientist. Before coming to New York, she was Associate Director for Child and Adolescent Mental Health Research with the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), and oversaw the portfolio of research on child and adolescent mental health, from basic to applied studies. This gave her a broad perspective on research gaps and on ways to connect different areas of science through interdisciplinary theory and methods. She served as the Scientific Editor for the Office of the Surgeon General’s National Action Agenda on Children’s Mental Health with Dr. David Satcher.

Kimberly is Principal Investigator on several other major grants and subcontracts, all focused on improving the quality of services for children and families. Her special emphasis is on parent activation in children’s health services, as well as the organizational and policy contexts for children’s mental health services.

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2014 John Doris Memorial Lecture

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School-Based Prevention of Behavior Problems: Integrating and Advancing the Evidence Base
Monday, April 7, 2014

Catherine Bradshaw
Curry School of Education, University of Virginia

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2014 Doris Lecture: Catherine Bradshaw, Monday, April 7, 2014

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School-Based Prevention of Behavior Problems: Integrating and Advancing the Evidence Base
Catherine Bradshaw, University of Virginia

Monday, April 7, 2014
12:00pm
102 Mann Library



This event is free and open to all, no registration required. Lunch will immediately follow the lecture.

Schools are an important context for children's development and the prevention of behavioral and mental health problems. In addition, the importance of school climate has been linked with a range of positive behavioral and academic outcomes for students and staff. In her talk, Catherine Bradshaw provides an overview of some evidence-based approaches for the prevention of problem behavior through schools. She draws on data from several large-scale randomized controlled trials of prevention programs, such as the Good Behavior Game and Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, and efforts to scale-up these programs state-wide. Dr. Bradshaw also considers the importance of implementation science and coaching supports to better understand what works for whom, under what conditions. Her findings will be presented from a series of studies funded by Center for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institute on Drug Abuse, United States Department of Education, Institute of Education Science, and the William T. Grant Foundation.

Catherine Bradshaw, Ph.D., M.Ed., is a Professor and the Associate Dean for Research and Faculty Development at the Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia (UVA). Prior to her current appointment at UVA, she was an Associate Professor and the Associate Chair of the Department of Mental Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She maintains an affiliation with Johns Hopkins as the Deputy Director of the CDC-funded Johns Hopkins Center for the Prevention of Youth Violence and Co-Director of the NIMH-funded Johns Hopkins Center for Prevention and Early Intervention. She holds a doctorate in developmental psychology from Cornell University and a masters of education in counseling and guidance from the University of Georgia. Her primary research interests focus on the development of aggressive behavior and school-based prevention. She collaborates on research projects examining bullying and school climate; the development of aggressive and problem behaviors; effects of exposure to violence, peer victimization, and environmental stress on children; and the design, evaluation, and implementation of evidence-based prevention programs in schools. She presently collaborates on federally supported randomized trials of school-based prevention programs, including Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) and social-emotional learning curricula. She also has expertise in implementation science and coaching models. Dr. Bradshaw works with the Maryland State Department of Education and several school districts to support the development and implementation of programs and policies to prevent bullying and school violence, and to foster safe and supportive learning environments. She collaborates on federally-funded research grants supported by the NIMH, NIDA, CDC, and the Institute of Education Sciences. She is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Research on Adolescence and the editor elect of Prevention Science. She is a coeditor of the forthcoming book, Handbook of School Mental Health (Springer).

 

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2013 John Doris Memorial Lecture

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School-Randomized Experiments to Improve Children’s Academic and Social-Emotional Outcomes: Lessons from U.S. and Congo
April 9, 2013

Lawrence Aber
Psychology and Public Policy, New York University

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Video of Lawrence Aber’s 2013 Doris Lecture is now online

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Video of the 2013 John Doris Memorial Lecture, School-Randomized Experiments to Improve Children’s Academic and Social-Emotional Outcomes: Lessons from U.S. and Congo, delivered by Lawrence Aber is now available. The lecture was held on Tuesday, April 9, 2013 in 102 Mann Library, Cornell University campus.

Lawrence Aber and BCTR director John Eckenrode

Lawrence Aber

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The video is also archived in the Media Library.

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Lawrence Aber to deliver the 2013 Doris Lecture

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The BCTR is pleased to announce that Lawrence Aber will deliver the annual John Doris Memorial Lecture on Tuesday, April 9th, 2013 at 12:00pm in Room 102 Mann Library, Cornell campus.

Lawrence Aber is Distinguished Professor of Applied Psychology and Public Policy at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University, where he also serves as board chair of its Institute of Human Development and Social Change. Dr. Aber earned his Ph.D. from Yale University and an A.B. from Harvard University. He previously taught at Barnard College, Columbia University, and at the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, where he also directed the National Center for Children in Poverty. He is an internationally recognized expert in child development and social policy and has co-edited Neighborhood Poverty: Context and Consequences for Children (1997, Russell Sage Foundation), Assessing the Impact of September 11th 2001 on Children Youth and Parents: Lessons for Applied Developmental Science (2004, Erlbaum) and Child Development and Social Policy: Knowledge for Action (2007, APA Publications). His basic research examines the influence of poverty and violence, at the family and community levels, on the social, emotional, behavioral, cognitive and academic development of children and youth. Dr. Aber also designs and conducts rigorous evaluations of innovative programs and policies for children, youth, and families, such as violence prevention, literacy development, welfare reform, and comprehensive services initiatives. Dr. Aber testifies frequently before Congress, state legislatures and other deliberative policy forums. The media, public officials, private foundations and leading non-profit organizations also frequently seek his opinion or advice about pressing matters concerning child and family well-being. In 2006, Dr. Aber was appointed by the Mayor of New York City to the Commission for Economic Opportunity, an initiative to help reduce poverty and increase economic opportunity in New York City. In 2007, Dr Aber served as the Nannerl O. Keohane Distinguished Visiting Professor at Duke University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 2008 and 2009, he served part-time as Visiting Research Professor in Evidence-based Social Interventions in the Department of Social Policy and Social Work, University of Oxford. He is also Chair of the Board of Directors of the Children’s Institute, University of Cape Town, South Africa; and serves as consultant to the World Bank on their new project, “Children and Youth in Crisis”. From 2003-2006, Dr. Aber chaired the Advisory Board, International Research Network on Children and Armed Conflict of the Social Science Research Council, in collaboration with the Special Representative to the Secretary General of the United Nations on Children and Armed Conflict and UNICEF. Currently, he conducts research on the impact of poverty and HIV/AIDS on children’s development in South Africa (in collaboration with the Human Sciences Research Council), and on school- and community-based interventions in the Democratic Republic of Congo (in collaboration with the International Rescue Committee).

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2013 Doris Lecture: Lawrence Aber, Tuesday, April 9, 2013

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School-Randomized Experiments to Improve Children’s Academic and Social-Emotional Outcomes: Lessons from U.S. and Congo
Lawrence Aber, Applied Psychology and Public Policy, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University

Tuesday, April 9, 2013
12:00pm
102 Mann Library



School-based interventions to improve children’s academic and social-emotional outcomes have a rich history in the U.S. and are of increasing interest in other regions of the world. This talk describes the rationale, design, and results of two large school-randomized trials designed to improve both sets of outcomes. The first trial tests the efficacy of the 4Rs program in primary schools serving low-income African-American and Latino children in New York City. The second trial tests the efficacy of the OPEQ initiative (Opportunities for Equitable Access to Quality Basic Education) in 144 primary schools in three eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo. Lessons learned to date and future opportunities and challenges raised by these efforts will be discussed.

Lawrence Aber is Albert and Blanche Willner Family Professor of Psychology and Public Policy at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, and University Professor, New York University, where he also serves as board chair of its Institute of Human Development and Social Change.

Aber, an internationally recognized scholar for his research on children and poverty, joined the Steinhardt faculty in 2004. His work examines the influence of poverty and violence - at the family and community levels - on the social, emotional, behavioural, cognitive and academic development of children and youth. Prior to coming to NYU, Dr. Aber was professor of population and family health at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public where he also directed its National Center for Children in Poverty.

He is Chair of the Board of Directors of the Children’s Institute, University of Cape Town, South Africa; and served as consultant to the World Bank on their project, “Children and Youth in Crisis”. From 2003-2006, Dr. Aber chaired the Advisory Board, International Research Network on Children and Armed Conflict of the Social Science Research Council, in collaboration with the Special Representative to the Secretary General of the United Nations on Children and Armed Conflict and UNICEF.

Currently, he conducts research on the impact of poverty and HIV/AIDS on children’s development in South Africa (in collaboration with the Human Sciences Research Council), and on school- and community-based interventions in the Democratic Republic of Congo (in collaboration with the International Rescue Committee).

Dr. Aber received an A.B. from Harvard University and an M.S. and Ph.D. from Yale.

 

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2012 Doris Lecture video now online

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Video of the 2012 John Doris Memorial Lecture, What the U.S. Can Learn from Britain's War on Poverty, delivered by Jane Waldfogel is now available. The lecture was held on Monday, March 26, 2012 in 102 Mann Library, Cornell University campus.

John Eckenrode and Jane Waldfogel

Ellen Doris

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The video is also archived in the Media Library.

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